The Scientific Research on:

Fluorescent Colors

The best proof is your own eyes. When is the last time you missed a school zone sign! The answer is almost never! When is the last time you missed a speed limit sign. The answer is, frequently! These results are not accidental. In the case of the school zone signs the government is putting their best research and knowledge into protecting our most valuable commodity! They are utilizing fluorescent colored signs. That valuable commodity would be:

Children’s Lives

The black and white speed limit signs easily go by unnoticed. Fluorescent colors literally reach out and grab your attention! They are difficult to ignore! Put this same research to work for you with your marketing signs and you have the most effective marketing tool that money can buy! Bar None!!!!

 Here is the research by:

Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C.

CONSPICUITY IN TERMS OF PERIPHERAL VISUAL DETECTION AND RECOGNITION OF FLUORESCENT COLOR TARGETS VERSUS NONFLUORESCENT COLOR TARGETS AGAINST DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS IN DAYTIME

Accession Number:

00677598

Record Type:

Component

Availability:

Transportation Research Board

500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001 United States
Order URL: http://www.trb.org/Publications/Pages/262.aspx

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Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/0309060648

Abstract:

A daytime field study was conducted to determine the conspicuity in terms of peripheral visual detection and recognition of different fluorescent and nonfluorescent color targets against different backgrounds. Ten color targets [6 x 12 in. (15 x 30 cm)], of which six were nonfluorescent and four were fluorescent, were tested against different nonuniform multicolored backgrounds. Three different painted plywood boards of 4 x 4 ft (1.2 x 1.2 m) depicting either typical city, fall foliage, or spring foliage background colors were used as the backgrounds. The stimuli (color targets) were presented at three different peripheral angles (20, 30, and 40 degrees to the right of the line of sight) against the different backgrounds. Twelve subjects with normal color vision between the ages of 20 and 22 years participated in the experiment, which was conducted on an unused airport runway. A randomized block experimental design was used in such a way that for each subject the order of presentation of the three peripheral angles was random so that each angle occurred exactly once. Furthermore, for a given angle the order of presentation for the backgrounds was randomized so that each background occurred exactly once. For each background and for each of the two blocks of 10 colors each color was randomized in such a way that each color target appeared exactly once in the first block as Replication 1 and exactly once in the second block as Replication 2. Daytime chromaticity measurements were recorded for all of the color targets and background colors along with daytime luminance measurements of all of the color targets and backgrounds. The data were analyzed for two conditions: (a) detection percentage of total responses on the basis of the total number of presentations in which the subject detected the presence of a color target but in which the subject’s color recognition response could be either the correct color or an incorrect color and (b) recognition percentage of the correct color target recognitions on the basis of the total number of presentations in which a subject’s response with regard to the recognition of the color of the target was correct. In general, fluorescent yellow was found to be best detected and fluorescent orange was found to be best recognized against any of the three backgrounds investigated. Looking at the results of the study and the increased detection and recognition performances achieved with fluorescent colors for the conditions investigated, one may tentatively conclude that the fluorescent colors investigated in the study are considerably more conspicuous during daytime in terms of the peripheral detection and recognition percentages. It is recommended that designers of traffic signs, personal conspicuity enhancement items and devices, and roadside traffic control devices consider the superior visual conspicuity properties of fluorescent colors (especially fluorescent yellow and fluorescent orange) and incorporate them in designs when the highest possible daytime target conspicuity is absolutely necessary.

Supplemental Notes:

This paper appears in Transportation Research Record No. 1456, Traffic Signing, Signals, and Visibility.

Monograph Accession #:

01396801

Language:

English

Authors:

Zwahlen, Helmut T
Vel, Uma Devi

Pagination:

p. 125-138

Publication Date:

1994

Serial:

Transportation Research Record

Issue Number: 1456
Publisher: Transportation Research Board
ISSN: 0361-1981

ISBN:

0309060648

Features:

Figures (10) ; References (13) ; Tables (4)

Uncontrolled Terms:

Old TRIS Terms:

 

Subject Areas:

Geotechnology; Highways; Materials; Operations and Traffic Management; Safety and Human Factors; I35: Miscellaneous Materials; I73: Traffic Control

Files:

TRIS, TRB

Created Date:

May 4 1995 12:00AM

http://trid.trb.org/view/425294

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